The TN Central in Cumberland County

The hidden history of how Cumberland County finally got the railroad to come through town.

Cumberland County Playhouse

The Cumberland County Playhouse is a culture that is completely unique to our town. Its Christmas traditions are some that many of us will never forget, but what is even more interesting is that the playhouse’s beginnings were completely unplanned.

The Last Chickamauga Cherokee Chief & the Cumberland Plateau

The Last Chickamauga Cherokee Chief’s role in signing a treaty giving the Scot-Irish settlers the rights to Cherokee hunting land and how it lead to the chiefs infamous assassination.

Staffing and WWII

Staffing has been around for a long time. The rumor is the idea began around 1600 in Britain, but American staffing hit its big boom during World War 2 when five million women left their home to work.

A Tennessee Thanksgiving and ALCOA Aluminum

In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a National Holiday.
But did you know that Tennessee’s biggest Thanksgiving influence is ALCOA?

Appalachian Craftsmanship

The Appalachian way of life that is now known for its artistry, folklore, moonshine, and hillbilly ways were not for “looks” but necessity

Dr. May Wharton’s Introduction to Cumberland County

When the influenza of 1918 hit Cumberland County Dr. Wharton was brand new. She had to quickly learn the mountain people’s ways to help them survive, and she did.

Geology & Industry on the Plateau

The Cumberland Plateau is a geological wonder known to geologists as the Appalachian Plateau. It rises over 1000 feet above every other region around it. The layers of limestone, shale, coal, and sandstone make up the mountain at 1,800 feet above sea level. From the earliest settlements of Cumberland County it was clear that these natural resources were the key to survival and building an industrious town. 

Beginning the Cumberland Homesteads

The stock market crashed in October of 1929 and by 1933 Cumberland County was literally starving. During the Great Depression one in four workers were unemployed, farmer’s could not afford their land anymore, sharecroppers were evicted, and wages were slashed. There was a walkout at the Harriman Hosiery Mill, a strike at the mines in Wilder, and “impending civil war.” Residents were tired, hungry, fed-up, and feeling overlooked. 

Alvin C. York

Sergeant Alvin C. York, the most famous Medal of Honor winner in WWI history, a Tennessee treasure

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